top of page
Search

Moody’s report shows CAQ’s plan will decimate English language Universities




MONTREAL, QUEBEC – The Coalition Avenir Quebec (CAQ) was warned that raising university tuition for out of province students at English-speaking universities would cause irreparable damage. University heads spoke out then, as did the Canadian Party of Quebec (CaPQ). And, now, it would seem, those warnings are being echoed by none other than Moody’s Ratings.

The bond credit rating agency released its report on Quebec, last week, citing budgetary pressures on McGill, Concordia, and Bishop’s universities, given the predicted drop in enrolment in the wake of the CAQ government’s announcement.

“Anglo institutions are always the casualties on the moral battleground of Quebec language politics,” said CaPQ leader Colin Standish. “The CAQ’s goal, just as it’s been for separatist governments in the past, is to preserve and protect the French language. Doing the opposite for other linguistic communities is not the solution.”

The Moody’s credit rating agency shows what CaPQ and others have already warned: that the planned tuition hike is a threat to institutions that have been a part of Quebec for generations. “Historical, successful, and world-renowned universities,” says CaPQ President Liz Campbell. “These are our institutions.”

The move is discriminatory and fiscally irresponsible. “But, this is what the Quebec government wants,” says Standish. “And the Moody’s report shows we’re being drawn closer to the brink.”

About the CaPQ:

The Canadian Party of Quebec (CaPQ) offers a bold, forward-looking, federalist vision of Quebec to promote a renaissance to make the province a major economic, cultural, and linguistic rights hub of Canada and North America.

Contact information:
Canadian Party of Quebec - Parti canadien du Québec
CaPQ_Press_Release_27.May.24_EN.docx
.pdf
Download PDF • 134KB

1 view

Recent Posts

See All

Calling Pascale Dery to account

By Colin Standish, Co-Leader MONTREAL, QUEBEC – The community that produced Pascale Déry, Québec’s current Minister of Higher Education, is starting to wonder who she thinks she is, and if she has any

Comments


bottom of page